Category Archives: Quit

Hate your job? March 31 2017 is International Quit Your Crappy Job Day

Too many people hate their jobs but still stay in them for years. This is what we know:

  • Around 20-40% of employees are unhappy at work
  • Hating your job can severely damage your career, your health, your relationships and your private life
  • Many people are reluctant to quit and stay for too long in bad jobs

This is clearly a recipe for disaster for everyone who feels stuck in an unhappy work situation.

We want to change that, so we’ve declared March 31 to be International Quit Your Crappy Job Day and have created a web site to match at www.internationalquityourcrappyjobday.com.

Here’s our announcement:

On the site you can take a test to see if it might be time to quit and you can read a number of articles about quitting.

There are also a ton of stories from people who found the courage to quit bad jobs. This one is my favorite.

So if you are not happy at work, take a look at the site. Or if someone you know and love is stuck in a crappy job, consider sharing the site with them.

We want more people to quit, but more than that we want many more people to realize that they have that option. Because if you hate your job, but believe that you are not free to quit and get away, the situation gets much, much worse.

For anyone who didn’t quit yesterday, get our best tips on becoming happier in the job you have

Quityourcrappyjob

International Quit Your Crappy Job Day was yesterday – March 31.

The day is our attempt to convince more people who hate their jobs that quitting IS an option – and often the best option.

But of course we realize that quitting is not for everyone. Maybe you’re not that miserable at work or maybe you’re simply not currently in a position to quit for financial or other reasons.

So if you are unhappy at work but not ready to quit, the important thing is that you do something to become happier at work.

And to the effect we have gathered a list of resources here. These are some of our best tips on becoming happier in the job you already have. We share them in the hope that they can help more people become happy at work.

TODAY is International Quit Your Crappy Job Day. Happy quitting!

Quityourcrappyjob

Are you unhappy at work? Have you been wondering for a while if maybe it’s time to quit?

You’re in luck: Today is International Quit Your Crappy job Day. This is your chance to get away from a terrible boss, meaningless job, toxic workplace culture, boring tasks or whatever is dragging you down.

Because no one should stay in a job they hate. It hurts your career, your health and private life.

At the web site www.internationalquityourcrappyjobday.com you can:

For anyone who is unhappy at work, the site may help you consider the options and get some clarity in how to proceed.

So we wish everyone a happy and productive International Quit Your Crappy Job Day 2016 :)

5,000 people took our “is it time to quit” test. These are the results.

5000 took our test here are results

If you are not happy at work, we have a simple test you can take to see if it might be time to quit.

So far 5,000 people have taken the test and you can see the results above.

Please note that we can make no inferences about how happy or unhappy people are at work in general based on these results, because the people who take this test are clearly not a representative sample – they will skew strongly towards the unhappy.

You can take the test yourself here.

And remember: March 31 is International Quit Your Crappy Job Day.

Quityourcrappyjob

Hate your job? March 31 is International Quit Your Crappy Job Day

Too many people hate their jobs but still stay in them. This is what we know:

  • Around 20-40% of employees are unhappy at work
  • Hating your job can harm your career, your health and your private life
  • Many people are reluctant to quit and stay for too long in bad jobs

This is clearly a recipe for disaster for everyone who feels stuck in an unhappy work situation.

We want to change that, so we’ve declared March 31 to be International Quit Your Crappy Job Day and have created a web site to match at www.internationalquityourcrappyjobday.com.

Here’s our announcement:

On the site you can take a test to see if it might be time to quit and you can read a number of articles about quitting, including:

There are also a ton of stories from people who found the courage to quit bad jobs. This one is my favorite.

So if you are not happy at work, take a look at the site. Or if someone you know and love is stuck in a crappy job, consider sharing the site with them.

We want more people to quit, but more than that we want many more people to realize that they have that option. Because if you hate your job, but believe that you are not free to quit and get away, the situation gets much, much worse.

3 reasons why “Never Give Up” is really bad advice

Ever seen one of these little “inspirational” images on facebook or linkedin? They’re are all over the damn place :)

Not only is this kind of advice vapid and simplistic (and frankly it annoys the crap out of me), I believe that it might ultimately be doing us a major disservice.

Here are 3 reasons why “Never Give Up” is really bad advice.

1: Sometimes giving up is just the right thing to do

TinaKibergI’m reminded of the story of the world famous opera singer Tina Kiberg.

As a child, Tina was a competent violinist and spent her free time practicing and practicing. One day she participated in a violin contest and realized that she would never be more than a mediocre violinist and that she also enjoyed singing more. She gave up the violin, took up singing and became a leading international opera singer.

If she had seen quitting as always the wrong thing to do, she might have been stuck as a run-of-the-mill violinist. Her courage to give up is what allowed her to become a world famous opera diva.

Now try to guess what these somewhat successful people have in common: Larry Page, Sergey Brin, Tiger Woods, Reese Witherspoon, John McEnroe and John Steinbeck?

Yep, they all dropped out of Stanford.

Ever heard that ”Winners never quit and quitters never win?” What nonsense!

Look at pretty  much any successful person and I bet their past is littered with things they did at one time and then gave up.

Sometimes you’ve got to stick with something, even through tough times. But sometimes you have to have the courage to give up. And you have to be open to the fact, that sometimes giving up is the right way forward.

2: Powerful psychological biases already make it hard for us to give up

There are a number of cognitive processes that systematically make it harder for us to leave existing situations and move on to something new – even when we’re miserable with the status quo.

Just off the top of my mind, here are some cognitive biases, that conspire to keep us stuck in bad situations:

The sunk cost fallacy
When you’ve spent a lot of time/money/focus on something, it becomes very hard to walk away from it. People think “I’ve invested so much in this already. If I quit, that will all have been wasted.”

The ambiguity effect and the status quo bias
People tend to select options for which the probability of a certain outcome is known, over an option for which the probability of that outcome is unknown. Example: “I know my current situation is tough, but I know what I have. If I give up, I don’t know what I will get.”

Loss aversion and the endowment effect
Once we have something, we hate to lose it. Things we don’t have yet, don’t carry the same value.

Given these cognitive biases, it’s already hard enough for us to give up, which might help explain why people stay stuck in bad jobs, bad marriages,  abusive friendships etc. We don’t need the added burden of simplistic “Never give up” advice making it even harder for us.

3: Society attaches a stigma to giving up

And yet, in the face of all this evidence to the contrary, society stigmatizes people who give up. Quitting is seen as weak, as a lack of passion or as personal failure.

As I see it, “Never give up” is easy to say and therefore gets repeated a lot. It’s still not true and that makes it tremendously bad advice.

I think it makes more sense to tell people to know why they do what they do and occasionally evaluate if it still makes sense to be doing it. There should be zero shame in giving up a fight you can’t win or in dropping a goal that no longer works for you.

Quite the opposite – it’s the sign of a strong, mature mind to have the courage to reevaluate what you’re doing and either choose to keep doing it or to choose something else.

So the next time you see someone post one of those “Never give up” type images on facebook, be sure to tell them just how wrong (and potentially harmful) that type of advice can be.

Related posts

Leading with happiness: How Thyra Frank created Denmark’s happiest nursing home

Thyra Frank is a leadership legend in Denmark.

In 1988 she became the leader of a troubled nursing home in Copenhagen called Lotte.

She had no budget to change things but with lots of heart, a deep commitment to helping others and a healthy dose of common sense, she turned it into one of the happiest workplaces in Denmark.

In this funny and moving speech, she shares how she created a nursing home where the staff loved to work and where the residents were healthier, happier and lived twice as long as in other nursing homes in Denmark.

Our new study shows bad work days are too common and what causes them

Almost 2 out of 3

Everyone has bad days at work – those really frustrating and stressful days that we just want to be over. But how how often do we have bad work days and what causes them?

Our brand new survey of over 700 employees worldwide shows that bad work days are disturbingly common and reveals some of the main causes.

See the main findings here - it’s pretty fascinating stuff.

 

Have you ever quit a crappy job? We want your story!

i-quit

We’re preparing the next International Quit Your Crappy Job Day for March 31 2016.

As part of that, we’re going to create an e-book on quitting and as part of that we want to hear your story of quitting.

Have you ever left a crappy job voluntarily? What did that job do to you? Why did you leave? How did you do it? Then what happened? Did you regret your decision?

Write a comment below – we would LOVE to hear your story.

The most basic freedom is the freedom to quit

i-quit

Bernie deKoven points to this fascinating article by Peter Gray that examines quitting. Here’s an excerpt:

We like to think of human rights in affirmative terms, so we speak most often of our rights to move toward what we want:  our rights to vote, assemble freely, speak freely, and choose our own paths to happiness. My contention here, however, is that the most basic right—the right that makes all other rights possible—is the right to quit.

He looks at our freedom to quit i.e. work and relationships and show how important that is.

Gray points to hunter-gatherer societies as the origin of our freedom to quit:

As anthropologists have repeatedly pointed out, band hunter-gatherers are highly mobile.  Not only does the whole band move regularly from place to place, to follow he available game and edible vegetation, but individuals and families also move from band to band.

Because hunter-gatherers don’t own land and don’t own more personal property than they can easily carry, and because they all have friends and relatives in other bands, they are always free to move.

People who feel oppressed in their current band, and who find no intra-band route to overcome that oppression, can, at a moment’s notice, pick up their things and move out, either to join another band or to start their own band with a group of friends.

Fascinating stuff that has applications in all aspects of life – especially at work. As I’ve often pointed out, many people stay way too long in jobs they don’t like. Here are some examples: