Best resignation letter ever

Cat Sacdalan, a graphics designer, was unhappy at work. Not only that, her father had been sick, and the fact that she’d been working at home a lot to be with him didn’t sit well with some of her co-workers.

Cat wrote me that:

For 8 months I’ve been postponing my resignation. I’m guilty of some of those top 10 bad excuses. It’s amazing; it’s like you wrote down everything I felt (and more).

I finally decided to quit when, last week, my boss told me that people have come up to him, complaining that I shouldn’t be compensated for working outside the office. My boss says he appreciates my work but he wants to get rid of the complainers by heeding their request.

So Cat quit. And this is how she quit:

Best resignation letter ever

It takes guts to quit and even more guts to quit in crayon. I love it!

You can see more of Cat’s work here.

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55 thoughts on “Best resignation letter ever”

  1. I think my resignation letter comes in close second to yours…
    Dear Boss,
    Thankyou for offering me a new contract for the next working year, unfortunatly i wont be accepting it, thank you for all your support, i now realise that people like you should not be working with staff nor children, you are a bullly and you are fat!
    Yours sincerly

    I did not mean to give her this letter, i had forgotton i that i had written the bully and fat bit, especially as she had just told me about her new diet, although she is fat and a bully! xxx

  2. Dear cloejones, you may think your letter comes in a close second but actually it is without merit. Whilst certainly its childishness could be overlooked if the letter were to offer wit and humour it unfortunately offers neither. I and my colleagues would suggest you stick to your normal employment.

    Yours,

    Bob Holness
    International Humour & Comedy Monitoring Agency

  3. My favourite resignation letter went something like this:

    Dear [redacted],

    I am giving you my two weeks’ notice of my intent to leave your employ on [redacted]. I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for the enjoyable time I spent working at [redacted] but sadly have been brought up not to lie.

    Yours,
    Michael

  4. “I shouldn’t be compensated for working outside the office”

    What kind of draconian thought-leeches have afflicted these morons? Is work only valid if performed under the watchful eye of a higher-up? Somebody’s office needs a smack upside the face with the facts of production versus slavery.

  5. Here is the letter I sent to my employer three jobs ago.

    Dear Boss:
    I am certain that the subpoena you sent to my home was a mistake. The computer I took from the office is still in the parking lot where it fell out of the window of our 32nd floor office when the chair broke through the glass and caught on the power cord of the computer. I know it’s still there because I used the confidential file folders to sweep up the broken glass from the monitor as I didn’t want the already flattened tires on your Mercedes to get any glass in the knife marks on the tires.

    I also wanted to clear up the confusion about the rainy day fund. I only gave the combination to the safe to the evening custodian so that she could verify that the cash box was in fact still in the safe after I left. I’m sure that if you contact her at her new address in Venezuela she can confirm this.

    Finally I want to thank you for giving me the opportunity to resign eventhough the letter I received said I was fired for malfeasance, volitility, and bringing my feral cats to work. I had to look up what those words meant in the dictionary and when I did I found some other words that gave me a better idea of how to use the adult videos you and I made next to the copy machine.

    So as you can tell from this letter I have no bitterness or regret, and I believe the time I spent working for your company enabled me to be a better person.

    PS. If you do find the Smith & Wesson in the office, please be assured that it wasn’t loaded when I brought it to work, and I’m not sure why the other employees pitched in to buy the ammunition.

    Best wishes.

  6. “my boss told me that people have come up to him, complaining that I shouldn’t be compensated for working outside the office. My boss says he appreciates my work but he wants to get rid of the complainers by heeding their request.”

    She may not have realized it but she was actually fired according to this and she should be getting unemployment.

  7. Wow, what a brilliant and unique way to highlight the individuality and original thinking capabilities that the company was losing! Hats off to Cat.

    However, the satire of the letter underscores Piccoli’s point. Why is it that, rather than being judged for our input and output at work, we are still judged by:
    1. The hours we put in?
    2. Where we carry it out?

    It also speaks volumes for the lack of moral fibre of a boss who is unable to stand up for his people.

  8. CloeJones: Ouch – that’s harsh :o)

    Nutster: I agree – this is a fun, playful approach to a serious situation. I knew you’d dig it :o)

    Fran & Michael :o)

    Geo: Not a bad point!

    Piccoli & Bay: I agree – we’re stuck in a very old-fashioned approach to work.

    Heino: No, no – she told me that she fixed the mistake and handed in the updated version but didn’t have time to scan it first. So we have the faulty one :o)

  9. I really couldn’t get over that “7″ under my sig, the past 3 days at home. But it’s Friday here so I’m at the office again (I’ve been coming in during Mondays and Fridays, and will continue ’till the end of the July). I was able to ask HR for a scanned copy of the fixed version. Sent Alex a copy. Finally, I can stop staring at that 7! Didn’t know making a mistake like a typo could be this fun. So that’s one thing to note when writing in crayons. Made me miss that handy-dandy spell check and automated date feature. Thanks again, Alex, for sharing this. I appreciate hearing other people’s insights :O)

  10. Damn, makes me wish I’d resigned from jobs like this in the past! I work for myself now though and I don’t know if it’s possible to quit my own company. Still, if I do I’ll try doing it in fingerpaints. Fun for everyone!

  11. This is the worse resignation letter I’ve ever seen. The technical industry could be a “small world” where everyone know each other and create good relationship between them. When it’s time to resign from your job, make sure you do so in a way that won’t leave a negative impression of you with your previous employer. Your aim when writing a letter of resignation should be to create a document which your boss can hold in his / her hand and feel absolved of any blame or fault over your departure.

  12. “Your aim when writing a letter of resignation should be to create a document which your boss can hold in his / her hand and feel absolved of any blame or fault over your departure.”

    You have GOT to be effin’ kidding, Vincente! Your former boss should feel absolved of any blame or fault over your departure?! What if your former boss WAS THE VERY REASON FOR YOUR DEPARTURE?! Should s/he still feel absolved? (Or should s/he just be pushed under the next bus thus solving the problem once and for all?)

    This cult of worshipping the almighty boss has to quit. It’s attitudes like yours, Vincente, that have led to the toxic workplaces we have now in the first place!

  13. After three years in working at an unhappy job that paid very well and had tons of vacation time – but was going nowhere and had abusive bullying staff in management – I finally gave my resignation. The people that worked for me and some of my colleagues were great and the people I looked after were wonderful so – it was not all bad…but at the end of the day…I was mostly miserable 70% of the time in frustration unable to achieve what I wanted from my career and being hindered and only reasonably happy 30% of the time at work working with my staff. I found what I think will be a great job and finally resigned (nobody was surprised as management is truly terrible). As I work in a small specialized field where there are only a few of us, and future collaborations and meetings are likely, I did not see the point in burning bridges. I do not believe anything is achieved by telling your job/boss how horrible they are as it is not your problem anymore and if the company is horrible – it isn’t likely to achieve anything if you point it out to them…as I am sure they are well aware. If you are leaving – why burn bridges when you may never know in the future if you will encounter or have to work with them. I just can not figure out after giving notice…why I am so sad about the whole thing…I figured I should be happy but I do feel bad for the people who worked for me and who worked with me who were great and went the extra mile for me. Hope this is normal and this will pass and is part of the due process.

  14. I love it.

    In response to Vincente: if you consider just the content, and ignore the medium, there is absolutely nothing unprofessional about this resignation letter. It’s gracious, it explains her reason for leaving in a straight-forward way, provides ample notice and includes offer to freelance if requested to assist the transition to a replacement.

    At the same time, given the context, the fact that the letter is written in multi-colored crayon amounts to a weird but well-deserved rebuke. This letter is a work of art.

  15. This is really the weirdest but the best resignation letter i’ve ever seen! This only proves that she’s really an artist. Filipino’s are really creative!

  16. Well done Cat.. Being in a similar situation at the moment, your choice of medium for delivery is truly inspiring

  17. Remember one thing – “NEVER STEP ON ANYONE CLIMBING A LADDER, AS YOU NEVER KNOW IF/WHEN YOU’LL MET THEM AGAIN ON THE WAY BACK DOWN” – Thinking you’ll be “having the last laugh” with a “F-YOU” resignation letter is never the case, it makes you look unprofessional and like a ‘sore loser’, even if it is fully justified. Let your resignation speak for itself, because if it doesn’t, then the company wasn’t worth working for in the first place. Be the better person! :)

  18. November 30 , 2007
    To,
    Mrs Anita Merchant,
    Managing Director,
    ABC Travel And Forex (I) Pvt Ltd,
    Mumbai.
    Sub: Letter of Resignation.
    Dear Madam,

    I would like to submit my resignation from the position of Account Assistance . I am putting my resignation on November 30, 2007 and I request you to please relieve me of my duties by December 30th 2007 .
    I would like to thank you for the exposure that you have provided me in this organization. I am sure I will carry and cherish this experience throughout my professional career.
    I shall appreciate an early settlement of all my dues entitled.
    Thanking you
    Yours truly,

  19. I want to resign from my company but I don’t know how to write the resignation letter. Will you please send me the perfect and simple resignation letter?

  20. my boss said me give resign. but i want to stay for still three months for my son’s education. so pls give an e letter to request 3 months time

  21. Giri -

    You didn’t describe the details of the situation, but usually being asked by your boss to resign is basically the same thing as being fired. A well -written letter is not likely to help here. You might need to talk with your boss about it in person.

  22. Dear Boss,
    I would like to thank you for all that you have done for me. I would like to let you know that I’m grateful to you for hiring me, and that I’ve enjoyed my time working at Company’s Name. Thank you so much, and best wishes.
    Your Name

  23. I would like to resign from this company because my health is critical position i want to take treatment and family problem also. but I don’t know how to write the resignation latter. Could you please send me a good sample of a simple, properly-worded letter of resignation I could use as a template?

  24. I typed up my resignation letter. I am going through something exactly like Analina said. I could say a lot to the management because they are terrible, horrible, no good and very bad. However, I chose to remain professional about it because truth be told, you never know what bridge you will have to cross more than once.

    I will put here what I sent to management. I found this template online:

    My Name
    My Address
    My City, State and zip
    My email address

    Supervisor’s Name
    Supervisor’s Title
    Company’s name
    Company’s address
    Company city, state and zip

    Dear _____:

    I would like to inform you that I am resigning from my position as Senior Customer Service Representative with (company name) effective (enter date), thus making (enter date) my last day.

    Thank you for the opportunities for professional and personal development that you have provided me during the last (length of employment). I have enjoyed working for (company name) and appreciate the support provided me during my tenure with the company.

    If I can be of any help during this transition, please let me know

    Sincerely,

    (Sign)

    (Print Name)

    This job caued a lot of oppression and stress that was made worse by the unsupportive management that didn’t want to do their jobs. They care nothing for morale and it extremely low. Half of this office is not at work any given day and they wonder why….A lot of my co-workers have psychosomatic illnesses and some are even taking anti-depressants just to come here. A lot of my co-workers are in therapy…all over this job?! NOT SO! I’m OUT! I stuck it out until I got hired elsewhere….I start at the beginning of the year so…PEACE OUT! My co-workers are awesome and I will continue to be their friends and pray for them all. I pray that God busts a move here real soon because this office is not the business!

  25. here’s mine:

    The purpose of this letter is to inform you of my resignation from XXX company, effective March 15, 2010.

    My experience working for the company had been very wonderful. You have welcomed me with open arms and despite my shortcomings as an employee; you have remained patient and supportive in building me professionally and personally. For these, I am forever grateful to you and the company. I have always considered it an honor and privilege to be a part of the family.

    Unfortunately, there have been some realizations on my part lately. The goals I want to pursue no longer coincide with the company goals. As you may recall I cannot finish the tasks that you have assigned to me. It took the team a lot of effort to do a specific job that was supposed to be done by me and I was almost always late when coming to work. Quite frankly, I don’t want to resign but I deemed it necessary. It was a difficult decision to make but in the end I had to be honest to myself and also put the company’s interest in mind.

    I am not applying or accepting any job offers from other companies as of the moment. I plan to work for my family’s business while sorting out what I would really like to pursue in the future. I’ll be back in the office to get my stuff and turn over my work for the remaining weeks. I would be glad to extend my assistance to facilitate the transition of the work to the next support consultant if needed.

    Once again, thank you for all the invaluable lessons you have taught me and making me a part of the company. If you have any questions, please ask. Thanks again for everything.

    do you think it’s too long?

  26. Hey, Tim,

    I don’t know about too long, but definitely too much information. I would not send this letter as it stands. It sounds like you’re going through a bit of a career crisis, which is fine, but you really don’t need to explain all this in your resignation letter.

    Others may have a different perspective, but the following is my advice:

    - The first two paragraphs (“The purpose of this letter…” and “My experience working for this company”) are great. Don’t change them.

    - The next paragraph reads more like a confession than a resignation letter. It’s clear that you feel like you fell down on the job, but I would not describe that in such specific terms. Even if the issues you describe are already well-known by your employer, it’s better for you not to document them in your own words. Doing so does not benefit you in any way, and it could hurt you in the future. If it were me I would consider deleting that paragraph entirely, but if you really feel the need to explain, keep it more general and less self-deprecatory. How about something like: “Unfortunately, for personal reasons, I don’t feel that I will be able to contribute to the company’s goals to the level that I would like. Therefore at this point I feel it would be best to resign. It was a difficult decision to make but in the end I had to be honest to myself and also put the company’s interest in mind.”

    - In the next paragraph, just delete the first two sentences, so it starts with “I’ll be back in the office…” It’s fine to tell people your current/future plans, but, again, it doesn’t need to be in the resignation letter.

    Again, this is just my 2cents, but I hope it helps.

    -Dave

  27. Read the whole thread. Kudos to people like Dave Martin. Now i know what (and what not) to put on my own resignation letter. Salamat! ;p

  28. Dear Sir

    This side is beast for every type of letter like resine, resume. So plz actvate my new a/c on this side.

    Thanks

    Rahul Saxena

  29. Faye -

    If I correctly interpret what you’re saying, you’re afraid it will be hard to write a professional resignation letter because you’re so upset about the working conditions and the way you have been treated. This is totally understandable.
    You could just write a very short letter stating your resignation; there’s no rule that says you have to state the reason in the resignation letter. Or you could state the reason in very general terms. For example, that the working conditions are unsatisfactory. You could even include an offer to discuss the reasons in more detail with your manager.

  30. I want to resign from my present work.I want to leave a good impression at this company and also the good relation I with my supervisor. But I dont know how to start.

  31. First of, Cat’s resignation above was oh so cool..I understand that Cat is a graphic artist designer so am not quite shocked seeing something like this as I have friends who were graphic artists too and they really had this craziest and out of this world ideas when creating their resume/resignation letters. It’s called ART! Love it! ;)

    Secondly, am planning of leaving my current company due to transportation issues. My company’s office just moved in to a new location, quite far and pretty unaccessible (unfortunate for me as I don’t own a car) and cost me big time for my fare as I have no other option but to take a cab everyday (for P280 just one way) on my way home and that costs me almost P 6000 monthly just for a fare (food not yet included). I don’t see house relocation would helped me solved my issues as am living with my mom’s house for free and my husband and I were just starting living our life together so we don’t want to spend another pesos for rents. So please, any idea how to compose this situation on my resume or should I just fake that I have other careers waiting for me along?

    Thanks!

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  33. i also want to write resignation letter with a notice period of one month and i also want to tell them to prepare my salary before leaving, can anyone help me to write my resignation letter or can provide me a sample?

  34. Well done for a person who works for graphic arts/designers. I’m not sure about the others. lol! :)

  35. Respected Sir/madam,

    After serious consideration, I have decided to resign from my post as Assistant Team Leader effective from (date) Though I regret to leave our team, I do appreciate your support during the 18 months of my service.
    Please accept this resignation letter as a formal notice.
    As per my contract, I will be happy to continue to work during my notice period until the last date we decide upon. However, I am ready to consider leaving earlier should we agree mutually on a suitable process.

    Please advise me of your preferred handover process for any assets that I might have and my current outstanding work.

    Yours sincerely

  36. Dear Sir,

    Please accept this letter as my resignation effective from –/–/—- hence giving you a —- notice.

    Sincerely,

    PS: not worth it to waste my time on writing it long enough.

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